Programming Interview Tips


When 
asked 
a 
question,
open 
a 
dialoge 
with 
the 
interviewer.

Let 
them 
know 
what
 you
 are 
thinking.

You 
might,
for 
example,
suggest 
a
s low
 or 
partial
solution
(let
 them
 know 
that 
the 
solution 
is 
not 
ideal),
mention 
some 
observations 
about
 the
 problem,
or 
say 
any 
ideas 
you 
have 
that 
might 
lead 
to 
a
solution.

Often,
interviewers
 will
 give 
hints 
if
you
 appear 
to 
be 
stuck.
 
 Often,
you 
will
 be
 asked 
to 
write 
a 
program 
during 
an 
interview. 

For 
some 
reason,
 interviewers 
usually 
have 
people 
write 
programs
on 
a
blackboard 
or 
on 
a 
sheet 
of
 paper 
rather 
than 
on 
a 
computer.

It 
is 
good 
to 
get 
practice 
with 
writing 
code
 on 
the
 board 
in 
order 
to 
be 
prepared
for 
this.
 
Here 
is 
a 
list 
of 
”do’s”
and
”don’t’s”
when 
doing 
a 
programming 
interview:


 Do’s

• Ask
 for 
clarification 
on 
a 
problem 
if 
you 
didn’t
 understand 
something 
or 
if
 there 
is 
any 
ambiguity


• Let 
the 
interviewer 
know 
what 
you 
are 
thinking

• Suggest 
multiple 
approaches 
to 
the 
problem


• Bounce 
ideas
 off 
the 
interviewer 
(such 
as 
ideas 
for 
data
structures
 or
 algorithms)

• If 
you 
get 
stuck,
don’t 
be 
afraid 
to 
let 
them 
know 
and 
politely 
ask 
for 
a 
hint


Don’t’s


• Never 
give 
up!

This 
says 
nothing 
good 
about 
your 
problem 
solving 
skills.
• Don’t
 just 
sit 
in 
silence 
while 
thinking. The
 interviewer 
has 
limited 
time 
to
 find 
out 
as 
much 
as 
possible 
about 
you,
and 
not 
talking 
with 
them
tells 
them
 nothing,
 except 
that 
you 
can
 sit 
there
 silently.


• If
 you
 already 
know 
the 
answer,
don’t 
just 
blurt 
it 
out!

They 
will
 suspect 
that
 you
 already 
knew 
the 
answer 
and 
didn’t 
tell
 them 
you’ve 
seen 
the
question
 before.

At
least 
pretend 
to 
be 
thinking 
though 
the 
problem 
before 
you 
give
 the 
answer!


Source:MIT

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Loratis Flagship and Trademark Workshop ‘Crack the Campus Code’


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I Gave Up?



Being on demand as creative person is challenging in comparison to think ‘to be creative’. One has to develop helpful habits, and that’s about persistence. There is no single recipe for a problem right away, identifying the stumble, fears and working through them is rarely fun. If we look closely into this pattern, at some point, all creative tasks become work. The mundane work begins – this could be boring, no more fun, less interesting, ordinary, boring etc a necessary to bring an idea to the world becomes the reality.

Edison, Einstein, Jesus, Buddha and various others worked everyday but they all had a common core of willpower and commitment as their driving force. Many creators have outworked their peers. If we look back into history, they were not given divine power or were highly intellectual with education or genetics; the biggest difference between the greats and us was their dedication to their art and commitment. Each one of peers are talented, or more so, but twice as lazy. All failures happened because they were consistently given up before there were finished. We hardly know the one’s stood second or third or later, because the world cares about ideas that are shared.

During our training course we tend to ask questions about ideas – Do anyone wants to be entrepreneur? Atleast 50 percent and above raise their hands. My next question has shown me the facts about this idea – What have you done in the last few years towards the idea? Many hands drop down. That explains everything; ideas are lazy. Ideas can’t do anything on their own. One has to understand that, the routine or ordinary work is important to make the real idea, it’s not the issue about creativity at all.

Whenever an idea has formed in one’s head, it has to leave the brain to change the world – a journey towards hardwork and dedication.

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Loratis Workshop for Ist Year Engg


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You in You!


Each one of us possesses everything necessary to be more creative. If we look into every amazing creative thing or idea such as – an automobile, an engine and wheels, a telephone, electricity and sound and others. If we look closely on all these great creative ideas, inventions, and theories are composed of other ideas. These tell us, to be creator instead of consumer, the existing ideas act as fuel for your mind. One should start looking at them combinations of ingredients waiting to be reused rather than as merely as objects or functional things. Increasing observations will help to increase creativeness.

Great tasty foods are combos, chef master learn to find, evaluate, and explore more combinations than other people. It has lead to increase the odds, by using reusable patterns to develop new ideas. For example, musicians throughout history have reused melodies, chord progression and even entire song structures. The Disney film ‘The Lion King’ is a retelling of Shakespare’s Hamlet. Shakespare was likely influenced by the early Greek tragedies. Any field of creative we can see that patterns of reuse and recombination everywhere. It’s an illusion when an author writes a book it appeared magically into writer hands from out of nowhere.

It doesn’t mean we steal and put one’s name on it. That’s theft, and fairly uncreative kind of theft at that. The goal here is to recognize how much inspiration, or recombine without breaking laws or violating trust. Because every field has its own rules and limitations, but creative fields are more liberal than you’d expect.

Why do we fail to observe as a creator rather than consumer? Stay tuned to read further, Good Day!

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Loratis ‘Softskills Certification’ Program


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Loratis Workshop for Engg I Year


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